NOAA: Extremely Rare Lightning Detected Near Earth’s North Pole Last Night

Lightning.

“…Lightning Detected Within 300 Miles of the North Pole…

A number of lightning strikes were recorded Saturday evening (Aug. 10th) within 300 miles of the North Pole. The lightning strikes occurred near 85°N and 126°E, which is about 700 miles north of the Lena River Delta in Siberia. This lightning was detected by Vaisala’s GLD lightning detection network.” – NOAA Fairbanks AK, yesterday

NOAA detected lightning strikes within 300-miles of the north pole at 85º north latitude between 4pm & 6pm AKDT on Saturday, August 10th, 2019.

“It’s uncertain how many lightning strikes in history have occurred as far north as Saturday’s event, but based on the worldwide lightning climatology map shown below, they are hardly seen in that region of the Arctic.”  – Weather.com

image: noaa, yesterday

Lighting in the polar regions is extremely rare.

THIS IS ONE OF THE FURTHEST NORTH LIGHTNING STRIKES IN ALASKA FORECASTER MEMORY." - NOAA, yesterday

About 70% of lightning strikes occur within Earth tropical regions with The Democratic Republic of the Congo seeing more lightning strikes than anywhere else on Earth.

In the USA, Florida sees the most lightning strikes.

World map showing frequency of lightning strikes, in flashes per square kilometer (km²) per year (equal-area projection). Lightning strikes most frequently in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Combined 1995–2003 data from the Optical Transient Detector and 1998–2003 data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor.

Saturday’s lightning strikes near the North Pole were mostly likely from elevated thunderstorms which develop when there is a layer of unstable air in the middle portion of the atmosphere. That’s in contrast to how most thunderstorms in the middle latitudes form in summer with the sun’s heating of the earth’s surface making the atmosphere grow unstable at lower altitudes. – Weather.com